Powerlifting For Women: What It Is Really Like

Robyn Pearce

The misconception that lifting heavy will make you bulky is a myth I want to get rid of.

These pictures are just a few taken from the UPA Powerlifting Competition that took place out in Dubuque, Iowa. I was unable to make the meet so I did not take these pictures.

Powerlifting for women is growing and I want to help others get started.

If you want to learn how to conquer your body by weight training, conditioning, and nutrition then you are in the right place.

Here are 15 examples of some of the strongest women in powerlifting. They aren’t bulky and you won’t be bulky either.

Female Powerlifter

Female Powerlifter

Female Powerlifter

Female Powerlifter

Female Powerlifter

Female Powerlifter

Female Powerlifter

Female Powerlifter

Female Powerlifter

Female Powerlifter

Female Powerlifter

Female Powerlifter

Female Powerlifter

Female Powerlifter

Female Powerlifter

Leave any comments or questions below!

2 thoughts on “Powerlifting For Women: What It Is Really Like

  1. I love this post! I used to weigh 250 pounds (I was aaylws overweight as a kid/teenager) In 2010 I think I decided enough was enough and I lost 100 pounds that year. I started running and got down to 128 pounds with 125 being my goal. I never made it down to 125. I realized I was miserable focusing on that number and running, and running, and running so much was not that fun for me. After I completed the full Shamrock Marathon in March 2012 I decided enough with running and I would try powerlifting instead. In October 2012 I competed in my first meet in the 148lb weight class and came out with a 250lb squat, 125lb bench, and 280lb deadlift for a 655lb total. I am SO HOOKED! I can truly say that powerlifting has changed my life in that I don’t obsess over how my body looks anymore. This stuff really works! Thanks for the post!

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